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Pardon any technical errors I make in this post. Per my understanding, the solution to bitcoin's lack of privacy is to use mixers like Tornado Cash or Whirlpool to "mix up" your coins to obfuscate their origin. Nice for the average consumer, but also potentially useful for bad guys such as North Korea. So the US government sanctions Tornado Cash after discovering the North Korea was a prolific user, and now any UTXOs that went through TC are blacklisted. Do you expect all similar services to eventually suffer the same fate? How do Whirlpool or others differ from TC? How should an everyday user of BTC go about getting a little privacy on chain? TIA
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privacy will never be spoon fed to you by the establishment. nobody has incentive to maintain your privacy except you. internet privacy is a big and constantly evolving topic. get learning.  bitcoin is the easy part. it is already built with pseudo anonymity. now you just have to figure out everything except the bitcoin part. including all aspects of your operational security when transacting, communicating, and even just browsing online. the world is adversarial and always will be. it is the way of things.
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TC has nothing to do with bitcoin.
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CoinJoin is just a way of doing a transaction. You can get a bunch of bitcoiners together and do a CJ on a bench in the park, over email or Discord.

Whirlpool, a CJ "service" is really only a decentralised protocol. Wallet software that "speaks" this protocol gets together over the network and executes Whirlpool mixing rounds without an intermediary.

TC is open source but the fact that it was deployed as a smart contract means it can be targeted. Sure, you can deploy copies but they will not attract as much liquidity as the "official" one (which is still available, just not over clearnet).

TL;DR: Tornado Cash is *nothing like* CoinJoin.

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