0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike

6 Answers

0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Interesting article, I agree with the concept of punishing the user and not the code. They could have just gone after the criminal directly, but I guess that would be too much work huh?
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
> Rather than punishing code, penalize the people who use the code. There are three types of Tornado Cash users who could be targeted by the authorities: relayers, liquidity providers and the Ethereum-rich.

There were better options for the government but in classic style, they used the easiest, most disruptive one and got a lot of flack for it.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
Tornado is a mixer that anonymizes crypto.  By its very nature and purpose, governments view this as money laundering.  I don't see much chance of this viewpoint changing.  

Instead of going after thousands of individual users, it is easier for governments to shut down Tornado.  Such a draconian move will also scare off anyone thinking of starting a mixer.  I am not saying this is right or wrong, but I am pointing out that is what's happening.
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
What is illegal in one country is now illegal in others. Smart contracts shouldn't need to cow tow to every government
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
tldr;

*This summary is auto generated by a bot and not meant to replace reading the original article. As always, DYOR.*
0 like 0 dislike
0 like 0 dislike
It's more easy stop USA

No related questions found

Welcome to Bitteg, where you can ask questions and receive answers.